PODCAST GUESTING – HOW TO GET BOOKED ON A PODCAST

Nicole's Tips…

  • PODCAST GUESTING was an opportunity for me to build real relationships with people who I respected, who I admired, and who had similar values
  • Whatever your niche is that you serve, there is a podcast for that.
  • I just had a call with a client a couple of weeks ago, and she said, “By the way, we just closed a deal with a multi-billion dollar company that specifically when we asked, ‘How did you come to find us?' they heard me on a podcast
  • The people I  really love working with, are the people who do have their systems dialed in 

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Doug Morneau: Welcome back, listeners. Today, I've got joining me in the studio a guest that's going to talk about podcast guesting. Nicole Holland is recognized as the international authority on podcast guesting and she's also known as a catalyst to generate creative out-of-the-box solutions for her clients, colleagues, and friends. Named in Huffington Post as one of the 50 must-follow women entrepreneurs in 2017, and rated on the New and Noteworthy on iTunes.

She's also featured in trending publications such as Forbes, Entrepreneur Magazine, the Huffington Post. Nicole regularly shares her expertise on podcast through virtual summits and courses, and from stages across North America using a high touch customers centric service delivery model. Nicole helps leading-edge thought leaders, authors and entrepreneurs strategically increase their visibility, likability and credibility in a way that works for them. Welcome to the Real Marketing Real Fast podcast today.

Nicole Holland: Thank you so much, Doug. It's an honor to be here.

Doug Morneau: Well, I can attest to her high-touch customer-centric service because we have had that privilege of being the receiving end as a podcast host of Nicole booking some of her clients with us, and it's been an absolute pleasure and probably the easiest interviews that we've ever done.

Nicole Holland: I love that. I love hearing it. It should be easy, shouldn't it?

Doug Morneau: It should. I just want to just digress just for a quick minute and reference an upcoming podcast next week. How did we connect?

Nicole Holland: How did we connect? I think I reached out to you on Twitter, didn't I?

Doug Morneau: Absolutely.

Nicole Holland: Or did you reach out to me?

Doug Morneau: Somehow we connected on Twitter.

Nicole Holland: I thought I reached out to you because I had heard your show and I really liked it. I think that's how that happened.

Doug Morneau: Well, that's a great place to start [inaudible 00:02:07] Nicole did the reach out to me through Twitter, so however we connected with each other. The reason I'm bringing this up is I'm just releasing a show on Why Social Media Doesn't Work … because people aren't being social. This is just proof that you can, in fact, build your business if you stop using social media like a radio broadcasting station.

Nicole Holland: Thank you.

Doug Morneau: Let's move on to what you do. For people that are listening, and obviously, you're listening to podcasts, so you like podcasts. The question comes, “Well, why would I want to be a guest on somebody else's podcast?”

Nicole Holland: Yes. Well, you may not. Podcast guesting, although it's my favorite strategy, it's really only a strategy, or a tactic, to be completely honest. It's not right for everybody. Some people, when we're talking about marketing, or we're talking about building a business and bringing in leads and generating sales and things, there are so many things you can do from traditional advertising to social media, to paid social media to groups, to all kinds of things.

You can have your own podcast, right? For me, I realized that podcast guesting was an opportunity for me to build real relationships with people who I respected, who I admired, and who had similar values. It was like, “Oh, well I would love to have a coffee with this person,” or, “I would love to go out to eat with this person,” but, they don't know who I am. So, they have thousands of people wanting to have coffee with them. That's not something that is an option.

For me, I thought if I can add value, if I can figure out what they want, and if I can serve it up, then there's a good chance that they'd like to have a conversation with me on the podcast, which also helps me get my message out, which helps me connect with their audience, who are my potential clients and customers as well. With that realization, that's what I teach others. But, you have to be … I think you have to be somebody who really does value relationships.

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There's a lot of people out there who get on podcasts because they see it as an opportunity to use the platform, but they don't understand that it's actually an opportunity to create, again, those relationships. So, people who go out on podcasts just to speak, just to get their message heard, without really having something deeper, it's not as effective. There are probably things like starting your own podcast that might be more effective. If you really believe in the power of connection and relationship, and collaboration and you like talking, then podcast guesting can be a great strategy to get your message out.

Doug Morneau: When you were saying that, what I was thinking was that it also gives you an opportunity to serve a wider audience. I mean, all of us have a sweet spot with our superpower, whatever that is, serving people in business and we can't serve everybody. So, another way I think, like you said, to give value, is you can serve a wider audience.

These people might not be your customer avatar because of your price point or how you operate, but if you can add value and teach them, then you're going to help them along on their business, and there's no expectation that you would receive anything. It's just, this is how I can serve my community.

Nicole Holland: Absolutely, yes. And, that's such a great point because a lot of people do make that mistake of seeing the audience as buyers. I mean, I talk about we want to find where your buyers are because those are the people interested in your topic. At the same time, something that a lot of people mistakenly do, I think, is go on shows to sell, or to pitch, and that's not the way to do it. It's to build relationships. When I say relationships, I mean at every level.

So, there's the relationship with the host, of course, and then there's that adding value to the audience in a bigger way, like you say. That, I think, is really where thought leadership comes into play. Whether somebody wants to write a book, or maybe they have written a book, or maybe they just have a belief that they think will help people … I think when you come to a place of integrity when you really are there to serve, it doesn't matter if it's in your business or just a hobby, or anything. If you have a mission and a message, and you find the people who are looking for that support, then you can really change lives.

Doug Morneau: I think that from a business point of view, it really is earned in media. It's funny how people often don't think of it the same way. I mean, if we're both in Canada [inaudible 00:07:14] phone you up, and wants to do an interview, you think, “Hey, this is great.” So, this is just another way to reach your audience because not everyone reads the globe, just like not everybody listens to my podcast or your podcast.

Nicole Holland: Absolutely. The beautiful thing is you really can get so specific because podcasting is still a fairly new … relatively new thing. I mean, it's been around for a while, and it's catching on very rapidly. A lot of celebrities are getting involved, a lot of big media is getting involved. But still, it's an on-demand, very specific niche market that you can … whatever you have an interest in, whatever your niche is that you serve, there is a podcast for that.

The people who are listening are tuning in because they really want to either be entertained, inspired, educated or a collection of those things. So, you have people searching for your expertise. It's not like they're just flipping channels. It's not like we're just reading through a magazine, or reading through a newspaper, but we're actually specifically tuning in for the content that you're offering.

Doug Morneau: Nicole, the starving crowd … I often ask people, “If you're going to start a restaurant, what do you need? Is it the best menu, the best location?” And, really what you need is a starving crowd, and by looking at podcasting as a long tail, like you said, people are looking for a specific niche. It might be bass fishing, or fill in the blanks of something that you're interested in whether it's a hobby or for business. That's the starving crowd.

They have subscribed to somebody else's podcast, they're listening to that podcast because they want that type of content. From a traditional advertising point of view, like you said, this is only one tactic. It's getting more difficult to drill down and find those specific people that have raised their hand and are waiting for your message.

Nicole Holland: Yeah. For sure.

Doug Morneau: Let's talk more specifically about guesting. So, for people that are listening going, “Well, okay. I'm interested in being a guest,” what advice would you give them in terms of considering this type of media?

Nicole Holland: I think the first thing you need to realize is that it's the right avenue for you because it's not a quick fix. It is a long tail strategy. It is something that takes time. Again, it goes to relationships. Some podcasters are booking months in advance, and some podcasters will schedule interviews and then they'll record and the interviews won't go out for months, right?

Once interviews do go out, there is a time that when it goes out, then it gets subscribers to listen, but that's not the end of it. It's something that can go on, and on, and on for many years, and people are just discovering it. So, when you record an episode, an interview with somebody, that can be that earned media and lead generation for many, many years.

Sometimes you won't see an immediate return, sometimes you will. So, yeah. First of all, think about is it the right format for you, and will you shine that way, and is it something that you think you would enjoy. Then, figure out what the shows are that your target audience is listening to. Something I see people make a mistake … or, in my opinion, it's a mistake, is they'll say, “Okay, I want to be a guest on podcasts,” and then they'll go into these Facebook groups and say, “Who has a podcast? I want to be a podcast guest.”

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Then, you have all these people going, “I need a guest,” and I don't recommend that as a way to get on shows because if you believe that you have value to offer, then you want to make sure you're being specific and making sure you're on shows that you value, and that will value you, and that there's that synergy. We only have a finite period of time.

We all have the same 24 hours in a day. It's far more beneficial to focus … if you have three hours in a week that you could do interviews, it would make a lot more sense to have those three hours go towards interviews that are going to move the needle forward for you, rather than just be experiences. Does that make sense?

Doug Morneau: It does, yeah. And, I agree. I mean, it's a long tail, it's a long-term strategy. It's not a short game, it's a long game. I had just done a solo episode talking about how to be a great podcast guest, and one of the things I had mentioned in there is that I want people that are not only smart at what they do and want to offer value, but one of the things that help me decide whether or not they're going to be a great guest for the audience and serve our community, is are they going to work as hard as I am to promote their show? Because I'm going to promote the heck out of their show, and give them as many shout-outs, and drive as much traffic to that episode as I can.

Nicole Holland: Yes, indeed. This is something also seen a lot is that guests will go on shows, and then it's like, wham, bam, thank you, ma'am. Bye-bye. Okay, I did the interview, now what? Next, next, next. Now, I want to get leads. They're just on to the next thing. A great guest actually appreciates the opportunity, recognizes that in order to have a podcast, it costs time, money, resources. You are being positioned. It's like if you were on a stage or something. You wouldn't just go on stage, runoff, and then be done with it. There's follow up, and there's preparation beforehand.

I like to talk about podcast guesting in that same way. The host of the show, the producer of the show, they're giving you a platform in front of people who they have already developed trust with, who are tuning in specifically to this show because they've added value to their lives. So, you get this prime positioning as a trusted expert on the show. You need to earn it. You need to take care of that host and appreciate that host and treat that opportunity as if it were worth hundreds or thousands, or millions to you, because it can be.

Some of the things that I recommend are once you do get the yes … actually not once you get the yes, but once you decide you want to be a podcast guest, go out and get some equipment. I mean, at the minimum, you can get a $25.00 headset that will make you sound better than just your computer audio. I recommend going to the ATR-2100. It's a very affordable option. It's Audio Technica-2100, and I'm sure, Doug, you'll put that in the show notes. This is a microphone that you can actually take anywhere. It's very light, it travels well, and it plugs through a USB. It's plug and play. It has a great sound. It's what I'm on right now. It's a quality microphone, and it's under $100.00.

That will demonstrate to the host that you're taking things seriously when you show up with great audio, when you show up for a podcast, that you listened to their show before, that you've given it a rating and a review. It means that you appreciate it, and then once you do that interview, absolutely share it. Put it out there on social media. If you have a newsletter, let your people know that it's come out. If you have a media page where you can backlink to the host's website, where your show is living. If you are a blogger, maybe take that content, or take notes while you're doing the interview, or listen after the interview, and make a blog post about some of the top tips you discussed.

There's so many ways that you can get the content out and show the host that you appreciate the opportunity and that you are doing something with the opportunity. I just had an earlier interview today where the gentleman that was interviewing me said, “Oh, you can download the audio, and you can take me out of it and use it however you want.” I said, “I don't do that. I'll be happy to share your show with my audience because that's what it is. It's your show. So, this is a collaboration when we're making this content, and it should also be a collaboration when we share that content.”

Doug Morneau: No, that's a really fair comment. You know, another way to think about it is if you're going to be a potential guest, you might be thinking, “Why would I want to send out my show? It's going to help build up the host,” the reverse question is, why would the host want to send your episode out? I mean, it's a two-way street. So, I think of it as a partnership, I agree with you.

It's a great way to build relationships because today, in the microwave mentality where we want everything in less than 30 seconds, and we think connecting with businesses is sending out a Tweet or an Instagram, or a Facebook post, it's not. This is a chance to have a conversation with somebody, a dialogue, a few minutes before the episode, a great conversation where you're sharing value with the audience and is a wind-up and a follow up after.

Nicole Holland: Indeed, and if you don't mind, Doug, I'd love to back to what you started with, and that is how we connected.

Doug Morneau: Sure.

Nicole Holland: We connected on social media, so I reached out to Doug, and I pitched him to be on the show, but I also … I knew why. I already liked the show. I saw the value. I saw the synergy. I loved that he's Canadian. He loved that my hair is purple. So, we exchanged a couple of messages and then we got on the phone. We actually had a real conversation. It was probably supposed to be five minutes, I think it turned into probably an hour and a half. But, therein was great value.

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I learned so much from Doug, and in fact, I just hired an assistant that I have been struggling with hiring. That was something that Doug has such a great handle on, and he said, “Do it this way,” and I did it that way, and yeah … I've got a great assistant now. It's just amazing how you can support one another when you connect with the host beyond just the content of the interview.

It really is that real relationship, and I feel like if I go to Vancouver, Doug is going to be sitting in office, you know? Maybe we'll go out for a coffee or something, but it's so powerful. It allows you to connect with people who you otherwise would not.

Doug Morneau: What do you think is the biggest myth about this tactic? We're obviously in the space, so we drink the Kool-Aid. So, for people that are listening, what do you think the biggest myth is of them being a guest on a podcast or starting a podcast?

Nicole Holland: About starting a podcast … oh, that you build it and they will come. I think that's the biggest myth. By being on a podcast, yeah. You're going to get out there, you're going to talk, and then you're going to have a flood of leads that can't wait to buy from you. While both of those things can happen, they don't happen just because you show up.

It is all that back work, it is the marketing, it is the attention to the detail and the respect for the other party, I think. When you come from that more holistic approach, all of those things can happen. You can have a killer podcast, and get lots of attention. I mean, I didn't know what I was doing when I started my podcast, and I've been very fortunate to get so much attention. It is earned.

I didn't go searching for it. I literally built my audience by going on Twitter, engaging in conversations with people I thought would benefit from my show, and if appropriate … I wasn't just blasting them saying, “Here's my show,” but if appropriate within a conversation, they identified something that I believed could be served with my show, I would share that with them and tell them which episode to check out. So, just by doing things not to get attention, but just to add that value over time, I have garnered a lot of attention and a lot of positive feedback.

Doug Morneau: I think the other thing our listeners need to remember, and I find this more with traditional media, is they forget … people forget that every reporter out there, every day, logs onto the computer with a blank page. As podcasters, or a media outlet like we have, every day we're thinking, “Who is our next great guest?” Because not everybody who pitches us is a good fit for our audience.

Podcasters, just like reporters, are looking for good guests. So, I think a myth is, “Well, I couldn't do it. I can't get in. It will be busy,” and I'm thinking the number of times I've got print coverage because I've reached out to a reporter knowing that I got something that can help them or is good for their audience, and you get booked, and people go, “How did you do that?” I say, “Well, you ask.”

Nicole Holland: Yeah, indeed. And, I think it's how you ask, though. I think it's, again, that awareness of what are their needs, what are they looking for, and is there a match? I just … right before our show, I had somebody who had been on my show before reach out and says, “I'm having a book launch at this time, and I'd like to come back on your show.” But, they had no interest, and they even said, “I can teach about this,” and it's like well, that's not what my show is even about.

Even though they had been on my show before, and they had been on other things I supported them in other ways, just coming back to me, it was like another ask without even considering what would be in it for me. I think that's really important, too, because podcasting is different than big media in that oftentimes, podcasters are independent. They don't have a huge team or an office with somebody sitting there waiting for the pitches to roll in.

They are doing a lot of things: they're running their business, they're running their podcasts, they may have multiple businesses, but they've got a lot going on. So, the podcasting is also, oftentimes, they know who their right guest is. I think when we come to them from a place of “Me,” “I am great, and that's why you should have me on the show,” rather than, “Hi, what are your needs, and can I help you fulfill them by being on your show,” I think it's a different approach.

Doug Morneau: Absolutely, and just so everybody is clear on this, we're not looking to have you on so you can talk about your business as an advertisement for 30 minutes or an hour. We're looking for you to add value to people with the expectation that you're going to help them, and you might not get any business directly from them, but you're there to serve them.

In serving them, you have an opportunity to show, first of all, that you care, and secondly, you get to show that you know your subject matter and become the thought leader. If people are interested in hiring someone in that space, they may say, “I remember listening to (fill in the blank) on a podcast, and this person was really smart,” and the business, like you said, comes later down the road.

Nicole Holland: Exactly. I just had a call with a client a couple of weeks ago, and she said, “By the way, we just closed a deal with a multi-billion dollar company that specifically when we asked, ‘How did you come to find us?' they heard me on a podcast,” so that … we had been doing podcasts for I think three or four months by that point, and not all of them were bringing in business, but all of them were adding value.

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At the same time, the business has been growing and exploding, and I have no doubt that a large part of that is through podcast guesting, but it's not always something that you can trace right back. So, when you are a guest on a podcast, I'd highly, highly, highly recommend losing your agenda. Just, lose your agenda.

You're there because you've done the due diligence, you've found a show that speaks to your audience, you've found a show that you like the host, you've found a show that you believe you can add value to, so just show up and do it. Don't worry about what comes next. You always have to have an opportunity for people to take the next step with you, but in terms of what you're doing there while you're there, I recommend being present, allowing the host to drive the bus, and having a good time.

If you do that, like you said, Doug, the people who are going to get value may be the people who may hire you later, or maybe they're going to know somebody who will, or maybe they're going to have an opportunity for you to come to their podcast, or to speak on their stage or an unlimited number of other opportunities that could evolve just when you show up and serve.

Doug Morneau: For me, this is a blast. I shared briefly before we were online here, that in terms of the interview with Adam Urbanski, I had a blast. That guy, I could have talked to for days, and our commitment is that when we're both on the same continent again, we need to get together and have a beer, a glass of wine, or a cup of coffee, or something because we were totally aligned on so many things.

Nicole Holland: Absolutely. Again, magic. When you show up in service, you can have so much fun, and you never know where that can take it.

Doug Morneau: What are you most excited about today as it relates to your business and helping people to become awesome guests and finding the right podcasts?

Nicole Holland: Yeah, well there is so much I'm excited about, Doug.

Doug Morneau: Okay, we're going to narrow it down to one or two things, then.

Nicole Holland: Yeah, so as far as podcast guesting, we've been bringing on a number of new clients who are really dialed in and actually, I turned away somebody yesterday and I'm finding more and more these days I'm turning people away. I love to serve. I love to share, so I do have a podcast called Get Guest Ready, which is where I walk people through the process of how do you find those shows, how do you get yourself prepared, how do you knock it out of the park, how do you pitch yourself … all of that stuff.

I love serving that audience widely. I love helping people get on podcasts. But, what I do is more custom, and isn't for everybody. So, I dig deep with my clients to figure out what are their goals, and who are their people, and then I go ahead and do that. Me and my team, we do all the heavy lifting, find those shows that are a right fit for the client, make sure the client is going to shine, that they're completely prepared, that they understand.

All those little things that make difference so that they can have those awesome conversations, like you had with Adam, to where that could turn into something bigger and more beneficial to both. Also, keeping in mind who the audience is, and making sure that they're there to provide value to the audience as well, and again, not just make it all about them and all about pitching.

Those are the people I'm really loving working with, is the people who do have their systems dialed in, they know their numbers, they know the value of a lead financially, they know what their ROI needs to be, and then we can really hit it out of the park with results-driven strategy.

Doug Morneau: I'm going to give you a heads up because I'm going to ask you a question in a minute that seems to stump most people. I don't think it will stump you. That is, a guest that I absolutely had to have on my show … I don't think I need to let you think about that too long, but I want to ask you a question that wasn't in our show notes.

I'm a big believer in learning for life, and I've been reading Tim Farris' book, Tribe of Mentors, and I came across a question that I thought was super interesting, and I don't hear it asked often. Here's our chance. It says, “What are bad recommendations that you hear in your profession, or area of expertise?”

Nicole Holland: Gosh, so many. And, the number one I would say is, just get out there. Just get yourself out there, just pitch a lot of people, it's a numbers game, you're going to get the show. It makes my skin crawl to hear that.

Doug Morneau: Okay. Fair enough. I mean, it's the same thing as just saying, “Just get on social media and post a bunch of stuff,” without any direction, you don't know where you're going to end up.

Nicole Holland: Yeah, and then the thing is, I keep getting, then … once I just … it's just not … it goes in the can, then they keep following up. That's brutal, too. That's been really common lately, and I've heard that people teaching if they don't respond, send them a follow-up, send them a follow-up, send them a follow-up. It's like, this is an unsolicited pitch. That's spam. No, don't keep following up, especially when somebody says, “No. Not interested.” So, yeah that would be my, I think, number one thing right now that drives me mad.

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Doug Morneau: Well, I don't have a problem with follow up if I'm in a sales role, and I'm selling to a client if the client says no and I really believe I can help them in whatever area that I can serve them. No, for me, is not going to be enough to get me to leave, but I understand what you're saying because you're pitching somebody to have you on the show, so it's really they're doing you a favor. I mean, they're good for their audience, but what they're doing is going to help you and your business as well.

Nicole Holland: Yeah, and I don't agree that pitching is the same as sales. Sales is a completely different animal, in my opinion, because I believe that podcasting is about relationships, and about understanding … even though, yeah, sales … you have to understand, or you should understand the desires of the potential client. But, if somebody says, “You're not a fit for my show,” and you keep writing them, it is not a good look.

Doug Morneau: No, it's not.

Nicole Holland: And, we are not big media. So, maybe you want to keep pitching the same morning show, or the same newspaper, fine. That's a totally different situation, but when you think about all of the things that the independent podcaster is doing, and it's also extremely, I find, disrespectful to make assumptions, and to send things … you don't even have the person's name. You obviously have never listened to the podcast, and you're taking this advice of just pitch, pitch, pitch.

It's such a bad look, and I see this from PR people as well, to where they will never, ever, ever get on my podcast. Ever. If they had taken the no, and then came back to me and said something like, “Thank you so much for letting me know. Is there a better time that I could follow up and see if you are accepting guests at that time,” or, “Is there something that you could tell me that would help me in the future to potentially get a yes from somebody?” Like that.

Follow up questions about the no, I welcome that. But, just following up after I say no, or when I don't respond because they're a wrong fit and they just pitched me like I'm a commodity, that, I don't think, is appropriate to continue following up on.

Doug Morneau: No, and it comes back to it's about relationships. Is that how'd you want someone to contact you?

Nicole Holland: Mm-hmm (affirmative), definitely.

Doug Morneau: Moving along here, why don't you share with us just briefly how you work with your clients and where people can find you?

Nicole Holland: Yeah, for sure. So, right now, while we're recording, my website is going through a little bit of a renovation. But, you can still go there. It's Interviews.Convert.com, and there is on that page, I think, four ways that you can connect with me directly. So, whether you found value in this podcast, or you do have a question about working with me, or you just want to send a love note, I love it all. That's at Interviews.Convert.com.

As far as how I'm working with clients, it really isn't a very holistic manner, so reach out and we would explore what your goals are for being a guest, and discuss the realities of how we could make that happen together, and take it from there.

Doug Morneau: From what I've seen, I've been the recipient of your booking guests, you obviously prepare your people very well: all the documentation, all the background, the bio, all that information is there. It saves me a lot of time looking them up, checking their social media feeds as I'm qualifying them, and you just kind of deliver it all on their behalf.

Which obviously, for busy people if you're listening to this and thinking, “Hey, I don't have time to pitch and reach out to people myself,” or, “My assistant doesn't have the expertise,” or, “I don't have my media kit,” I can definitely recommend Nicole and the due diligence that she does, and the heavy lifting that she does for her clients.

Nicole Holland: Thank you, I really appreciate that. I just took on a new client and she is in the middle of a bunch of stuff and getting really busy, so there is the time that it takes for us to create all of the resources and everything. People don't have to come to me with any media kit. You don't have to come to me with anything, as far as being prepared. Because that's what I do.

That's what we will do is prepare you, we'll prepare everything needed, and then we'll go out, do the heavy lifting, and you'll get a nice little email saying, “Here, you're going to be on this show at this time. Here is what you need to know.” It's, I would say, in the beginning … like the whole onboarding process for the client probably takes three hours total. Then, they don't have to worry about anything until … they still don't have to worry about anything, but you know, 15-20 minutes of prep before the show is a good amount. I make it as easy as possible for everybody to win.

Doug Morneau: Excellent. It's a bit weird asking you this question because the business that you're in, but I'm going to ask it anyhow. So, who's one guest that you think I absolutely have to have on my show? It doesn't need to be a client. It could be anyone in the world that you think would be a good fit, and provide value to our audience.

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Nicole Holland: I was just on a podcast interview the other day with a gentleman by the name of Mitch Russo. He has a podcast called Your First Thousand Clients, and I think the two of you would really hit it off.

Doug Morneau: Well hey, thanks for the recommendation. I will look him up or may tap you for that information.

Nicole Holland: Sure.

Doug Morneau: So, thanks for being such an awesome guest, and letting people know that this is a new media, a new opportunity for you to serve a greater audience, and be a podcast guest and that there's an easy way to do it.

Nicole Holland: Yeah, thank you. Thanks for the opportunity. I've really … I love it. Like I said at the beginning, it's not for everybody, but if it is for you, if you're a talker, if you really love listening, if you really love interacting and engaging with people, man, I don't think there's an easier, more fun, more fulfilling way to do it.

Doug Morneau: It may even if you don't consider yourself a talker, or a presenter, and you're nervous about getting up in front of a crowd, it's a really comforting way to begin your speaking about your business and your expertise because you could literally be in your pajamas. No one is going to see you. It's going to be recorded.

If you mess up, or if I mess up, or if Nicole and I said something that was off … it would just be edited out. So, it really is a chance to even begin that if you are thinking of a career, or furthering your career by speaking. This is, I think, a really safe environment to do it.

Nicole Holland: Absolutely.

Doug Morneau: Well, thanks so much for listening to another episode. I hope you enjoyed this episode. I hope it's given you some things to think about and some new opportunities to consider for yourself and your business, and serving a greater, wider community. As usual, we will make sure that all of the show notes are transcribed. I will have a link to Nicole's website, all of her social media sites, as well as her business, Building a Rockstar Show. So, listeners, thanks for tuning in. Make sure you sign up for our email list, and don't forget to follow us on iTunes. We'll see you next episode.

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Links to other podcast and or blog posts:

Real Marketing Real Fast Podcast – host Doug Morneau – Episode #41

 

PODCAST GUESTING – HOW TO GET BOOKED ON A PODCAST

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