SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

Tips from Matt…

SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

  • Create content for your products and services. Write about it – a lot!
  • Go where your customers are to get their attention

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
SHARE THIS EPISODE: – SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

[just click to tweet]

SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

Create content for your products and services. Write about it – a lot
Go where your customers are to get their attention
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Doug Morneau: Well, welcome back listeners for another episode of Real Marketing Real Fast. Today in the studio I've got joining me, Matt Watson. Now, Matt is the founder and CEO of Stackify. He has been a developer and hacker for over 15 years and loves solving hard problems with code. He sold his first startup, VinSolutions for over 150 million dollars and started Stackify to solve the biggest challenge he had while he was the CTO of VinSolutions.

Matt is skilled at SEO blogging and at content marketing. In addition, Stackify receives 100,000 monthly visits as a result of Matt's successful content marketing. So I'm sure we've got lots to learn from Matt, so I'd like to welcome Matt to the Real Marketing Real Fast podcast today.

Matt Watson: Hey, how's it going? Glad to be here.

Doug Morneau: Hey, it's going really well. It's gonna go a lot better 'cause you're gonna share your superpower and how you successfully started a company and sold it for 150 million dollars. I'm sure that there's a lot of people that would love to be able to do that.

Matt Watson: Yeah, well I think a lot of it was just hard work and timing and a little luck. I mean, I don't know there's too many super secrets to it.

Doug Morneau: Well, hard work always comes in there. I think people are surprised that you really gotta get in there and grind and work hard to make it work.

Matt Watson: Yeah, absolutely.

Doug Morneau: So why don't you share with you what Stackify is and what VinSolutions was? So just to get a little context of your background and what sort of coding and work you do.

Matt Watson: Yeah. So VinSolutions started when I was … let's see. 22 years old. So I was actually the technical co-founder that somebody else was looking for. Somebody else who had a business idea was going around looking for somebody who could help write the code. And a mutual friend connected us. So I was actually just the random technical co-founder. But I was the guy who said, “You know what? I can do this. I'll figure out how to do it.” And literally sat down in an Applebee's with the guy and said, “Sure, let's do this. Let's figure it out.” And just started a business. It was all kind of by chance, actually. So I mean, there's a lot of people out there that are looking for a technical co-founder. ‘Cause they have some business idea. And I was the lucky technical co-founder that day, I think, that was able to make it work. But …

So that business all started out with a simple idea, of how to take pictures of cars and upload them to the internet for car dealers. So at that time, this was in 2003, this was three years before the iPhone came out. Digital cameras were still pretty much a luxury item, and they were terrible. You know, it was very labor intensive to take photos of cars and upload them to the internet. And so that's where it started. And it grew into a giant company that did CRM software for car dealers. So basically, tracked all the interaction that a person had with the dealership and would send them emails. And the salespeople use it to track their phone calls and follow up and all sorts of different stuff. Kinda grew into a big sales and marketing tool.

Doug Morneau: So then what was the problem that Stackify, later, you started came along to solve the big challenges that you had?

Matt Watson: Yeah. So at VinSolutions, we were a very high growth company. You know, I went from having five software developers to two years later having like 40 software developers. And we had every challenge you could imagine in an IT perspective from trying to scale the software, the performance of it, bugs, new feature requests, all that stuff. And just didn't have the tools that my team needed to solve those issues. And so the goal when I left was really to build a suite of tools designed for software developers to help them understand how to improve the performance of their applications. How to know if their applications are actually working. All those sorts of details that developers need to know.

We're sort of like a … Stackify is sort of like the black box of an airplane. We collect a whole bunch of data and then provide a lot of reporting and insights into what in the world is going on and how do we improve this thing.

Doug Morneau: Okay, that's cool. Yeah, that totally makes sense. I mean, having looked through your website I get the basic idea. I mean, I'm not a software developer. But I could see, you know, why it makes sense to keep all this in a central place.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
SHARE THIS EPISODE: – SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

[just click to tweet]

SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

Create content for your products and services. Write about it – a lot
Go where your customers are to get their attention
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Matt Watson: Yeah, the easiest analogy probably is if you're ever on a website or you're on a app on your phone and you're getting frustrated 'cause it's really slow or it's getting errors or whatever. Tools like ours track when that stuff happens so we can tell the developers like, “Hey, your customers are on your website now and they're not very happy.”

Doug Morneau: So what are some of the barriers? I mean, is this something that people outside the software development industry would use as a tool to track like you said, the user interaction and how their server's performing?

Matt Watson: No, not really. Our customer base is really the software development teams. Now, it's across all sizes of companies, all industries. We have customers in like 50 different countries. So we run across everything there. But it is just software developers.

Doug Morneau: So I see you grew your company. Do you wanna talk a little bit about … you shared kind of the growing pains of the staff in that. But how did you guys fund yourself to grow to the next level?

Matt Watson: In my original company or my current company?

Doug Morneau: Either.

Matt Watson: Well, so, VinSolutions, we were all bootstrapped. We never raised any outside capital. We had, you know, our Visas and Master Cards. And a lot of times the founders, executives, we didn't pay ourselves or we paid ourselves late, all those sorts of things. But it was bootstrapped. It was a high-growth company that had no budgets and had no funding, either one. So we were just a little bit of cowboys, making it work. We didn't really know any different. You know, we had no experience at this. We just had a business and were making it work.

Doug Morneau: Good for you. Well, I hear often people say, “Well, I can't do this 'cause I don't have enough money. If I could just raise some money.” And lots of times I circle back and I'll see the same companies in the same spot two or three years later. And the story's the same, they're still looking for VC money. But they haven't advanced. So what advice do you give people that are saying, “Hey, I wanna move forward but money's an issue”?

Matt Watson: You gotta find customers. Or you gotta find people that'll work for sweat equity. You know, at VinSolutions there were many times where it's like, “Hey, payroll is due in three days. We're 50,000 dollars short.” And my main business partner who was the CEO gets the sales team together and say, “Hey, you need to call people up. Make a deal, do whatever you can, tell them if they'll overnight you a check we'll give them the sweetheart deal. Make it happen. We need 50 grand.” And you know what? They would do it. They'd make it happen.

Doug Morneau: I love that. I've never heard anyone be so forward and say that. But I mean, it seems to make sense. Why not sell your product? And if you need to take a thinner margin to make payroll keep the lights on for the longer term picture then just do it.

Matt Watson: Yeah, I mean that was … you know, the bad news for us is we were really growing in 2008 and 2009. So that was right when the economy kinda hit rock bottom there. And that's also when GM and Chrysler went bankrupt, and we were in the automotive space. So it was kind of a bad place to be for raising capital.

Doug Morneau: Well I guess you and I share some of those common war wounds because most of my clients were in the financial market.

Matt Watson: Okay, yeah.

Doug Morneau: So things went a little bit south for them, and we managed to just take a different approach like you did. We just sold more stuff.

Matt Watson: Yeah, and we were … part of our proposition to our customers than was that we were … we could help the car dealers move to do more online marketing and save them money. ‘Cause we combined multiple tools together. Well, before the big crash nobody cared about saving money. They were making more money than they knew what to do with. And they were still spending a crazy amount of money on marketing in magazines and newspapers and TV and all that stuff, more traditional. But then all of a sudden when the market turned down and they were starting to lose money, they were trying to figure out how to save money. And that really, I think, kinda pushed the online advertising to the forefront. And they stopped spending, you know, 25,000 dollars a month for an ad in the newspaper and all that kinda crap.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
SHARE THIS EPISODE: – SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

[just click to tweet]

SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

Create content for your products and services. Write about it – a lot
Go where your customers are to get their attention
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Doug Morneau: Yep. I love that. I mean I spend a lot of time talking to people in that space. And I had a friend that owns a car dealership and I'd say, “Hey, I feel so bad, I drove by your car lot over the weekend. I see you had a full back page in the newspaper. I see the radio station was there. You're serving hot dogs.” “Why didn't you stop by?” I said, “I felt bad 'cause there's no customers on the lot.” You don't wanna come eat one of those hot dogs you paid for after you spend all the money on advertising and no one showed up.

Matt Watson: Yeah, they got the balloons on the car and the bounce house and they're making hot dogs and nobody cares.

Doug Morneau: Aw, that was so funny.

So let's transition a little bit. So looking at your background and bio, it talks about your experience in content marketing and SEO. And obviously, you're a pretty smart guy to be on the coding side. But they don't seem to make sense to me, at least going from coding. What seems to be pretty analytical into content and SEO. So how'd you make that shift and how do you tie that into kind of your daily workload?

Matt Watson: Well, so I think part of the job of a really good developer or executive or CTO of a company is also the product owner. And so I've long felt like it's my job to know what the product does, how it works, what it's supposed to do, right? And part of that is writing about it. That's a key role for somebody at any organization is to be that product owner. And if you're a software company. If you make software, if that's what you do. The CTO, a lot of times, can be the person. So I've always kind of been the product owner. And so that forces me to do a little bit of writing and be a little bit of a cheerleader of the product and how it's supposed to work.

Doug Morneau: That's really cool, yeah. And I totally agree. I mean a lot of times people say, “Hey, my product's so good. People will find me.” But they won't find you if you're not talking about it.

Matt Watson: No. And so this really started for me way back in the VinSolutions days. I would do a little bit of blogging and trying to do some guest posting on industry stuff. And there were three or four keywords I was trying to rank for. I wanted to rank for automotive CRM. That was my big goal. And so I would do different black and white hat SEO sorta stuff trying to improve our rankings. And you know, this was many years ago now. But that was the goal, it was like, “How do I get on the first page of Google for this key phrase?” And I was trying to do different things.

But as an entrepreneur and a small company back then, I was very involved in our online website and marketing presence. We actually didn't do a lot of marketing at VinSolutions, which was interesting. It was all cold calling. That was pretty much our entire sales operation. We didn't even do marketing. It was kinda fascinating.

Doug Morneau: So where do you see that sort of approach? How has it transitioned from where you were then to today?

Matt Watson: Well so my current business, it doesn't work at all. Our customers are software developers. They don't even have phones or they don't answer phones.

Doug Morneau: That's funny.

Matt Watson: So yeah, that doesn't relate at all. But for car dealers, it's easy, right? You call them up like, “Who's the guy that sells cars? I wanna talk to that guy.” You get him on the phone every time.

Doug Morneau: Yeah. That's funny.

Matt Watson: It's easy, right? But for software developers, it doesn't work that way.

Doug Morneau: So do you wanna walk us through maybe a major success you've had in your business? Your business career? Or either of these businesses?

Matt Watson: Yeah. So the marketing side with Stackify, the challenge we had is again, you can't call them. They're also the most likely to use ad blockers in a browser. They're super finicky about all that sort of stuff. And spam, they hate spam. They pretty much hate everybody. But they really hate advertisers.

Doug Morneau: That's funny.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
SHARE THIS EPISODE: – SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

[just click to tweet]

SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

Create content for your products and services. Write about it – a lot
Go where your customers are to get their attention
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Matt Watson: Right? But they all have one … there's always one universal truth. If they have a problem, they go to Google and they search for it. Right?

Doug Morneau: Yep.

Matt Watson: Everybody does that. So even though they hate ads and all this other stuff, they have a problem, they go to Google, and they search for it. So that was really our big kind of shift about a year and a half ago was to go all in on the content marketing. And we look at, it's like somebody types something in Google, they're asking a question. If we can answer that question better than anybody else, we will rank on the top of Google and it'll drive more traffic to our site. It'll drive trials of our software, all the sort of stuff. And that's really been our big focus for the last year plus.

Doug Morneau: Well I mean that's a lot of insight. I mean this … unpack that just for a sec. So what you've … listeners, what Matt's talking about is know who your [inaudible 00:13:19] is and know what their behaviors are. Just because you wanna run a Facebook ad, if your guys aren't on Facebook, it doesn't matter how good your ad is. It's not gonna generate any sales.

Matt Watson: Right. It's figuring out where your central customers are. Where do they hang out? How do you reach them?

Doug Morneau: Well, and knowing their habits. Like you said, the tech guys are more likely to block all the stuff that I as an advertiser's gonna try to get in front of them. And if I do that, I'm gonna annoy them until they have a problem. And then if I can solve their solution then they'll like me.

Matt Watson: Right, yep.

Doug Morneau: So moving forward, what are you most excited about in the marketplace?

Matt Watson: Well our biggest challenge now is we do a great job of getting people kind of in the top of the funnel. We drive now about 600,000 people a month to our website from our content. Which is a lot of people.

Doug Morneau: That's a ton of people.

Matt Watson: A ton of people. And so that's up over 10x what it was a year ago. And our challenge now is figuring out, “Okay, how do we nurture those people? How do we qualify them? How do we pull them through the funnel?” That's our biggest challenge.

Doug Morneau: So how do you get 600,000 people to your site? That's a lot of eyeballs.

Matt Watson: Well, we publish a new blog post every single day. Many of them are longtail, but we do have some that drive like 10,000 a month. So you get a few of those, those are bigger chunks. But a lot of it is long tail stuff.

Doug Morneau: So you're publishing what, five days a week then?

Matt Watson: Yep, five days a week.

Doug Morneau: And how long is the average post? How many words?

Matt Watson: We shoot for about a thousand words.

Doug Morneau: Okay, so yeah, a good length. And then you're driving to the sales funnel. And what would your typical offer be to get people to sign up or contact you? What are you trying to get them to do on the first contact?

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
SHARE THIS EPISODE: – SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

[just click to tweet]

SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

Create content for your products and services. Write about it – a lot
Go where your customers are to get their attention
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Matt Watson: So our goal is to get them to start a trial of our software and install it and use it. We also have a free tool. So one of the things we decided a few years ago when we were trying to figure out how to reach software developers and kind of the challenges of getting traction and awareness with them is we built a free tool. So we have a product called Prefix. And we built it only as a lead generator. It's completely free. We have about a thousand people a month that download that through just, at this point, all organic of word of mouth or what have you. Or random people that come to our website and end up downloading it. And what we did is we took one of the features of our paid product and basically made a free product that just basically uses that one feature. And that's been really successful for us too, from a marketing perspective.

Doug Morneau: So where do you think the push points are for your prospective buyers? Where do they push back?

Matt Watson: For us, it's I think a little bit of timing. It's trying to catch them when they're looking for a tool like ours because they're being very proactive. They're like, “Hey, we're …” Think about healthcare.gov. When it launched, it was a giant disaster. So you get some companies like, “Hey, we're getting ready to launch this big thing and we need to make sure it goes perfectly.” So they're trying to be proactive. And then on the other side, you get people that are being very reactive. They're like, “Oh, we just launched and it's a disaster. We have all these problems. We don't know what to do.” So people come looking for tools like ours.

And so our challenge is actually to try and get more customers that are actually kind of in the middle. That they're not being as proactive, they're not being reactive. They're just kind of day to day usage. How do we provide more value to them?

Doug Morneau: Yes, so you want them before their hair is on fire.

Matt Watson: Yeah. Well, we wanna help them keep their hair from getting on fire, is really the goal.

Doug Morneau: Fair enough.

Matt Watson: But their challenges … their hair is always on fire. It's just like something else, right? And a lot of software developers kinda are professional firefighters. They're just running around all day solving problems and putting out fires. And a lot of times, they're too busy even if we have a better water hose. They're too busy to come get the better water hose. That's the challenge.

Doug Morneau: No, I totally get that. I've been there as well. Lots of times you're so focused on dealing with the problem you're thinking, “I know if I just set aside a little time, I could have a system. Or I could delegate or I could develop a process that could look after this for me.” But instead, you just keep dealing with the problems.

Matt Watson: Yeah, there's gotta be a better way but I don't have time to find it.

Doug Morneau: Yeah, absolutely. That's funny. So looking back in time, what advice would you give yourself or give an entrepreneur that's looking at getting into business or wants to scale their business to the point that you have?

Matt Watson: I think finding the right business partners is important. One of the challenges I had in my first business was the business partners that I had. So the original business partner, we actually had to split with. And had to buy them out and have a bunch of issues there. Then had new business partners come in, and all that stuff is really tricky. Dealing with partners. I think it's really critical to find the right partner. And a friend of mine says all the time, he's like, “I think it's easier to get a divorce than it is to split with a business partner.” And you know, finding the right partner is really tricky. And you wanna find something who can bring something to the table that you can't. Like if you're a software development, the last thing you want is another partner that's also a software developer. You want somebody who's really good at sales or marketing or go to market strategies, all that sort of stuff. That part of it's really important.

My current business, I don't have a partner. I actually did this all on my own. And some days, it would be a lot better if I had a partner. If I had somebody who was in charge of sales and marketing. That would take a huge burden off of me. You know, I'd sleep better at night knowing that I've got somebody I can trust that can run that side of the business.

Doug Morneau: Sure, fair enough. So what was your biggest marketing failure or assumption you made as you were growing your business?

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
SHARE THIS EPISODE: – SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

[just click to tweet]

SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

Create content for your products and services. Write about it – a lot
Go where your customers are to get their attention
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Matt Watson: That if you had built it they would come. That's definitely the biggest fallacy. Is … you know what, even with Stackify. Version one of the product we think we're gonna go sign up a bunch of customers but then just don't go anywhere. It's way harder than you think. It takes way more time than you think. It's not an easy process.

Doug Morneau: I love that. And I mean, that's so true. I deal with that so often. It's like, “Hey, I have this great product and …” “What are you doing for marketing?” “Oh, people just love it.” It's like, yeah. “You need to tell people. You need to build an audience and get out there.”

Matt Watson: Yeah. I feel like one of the key roles as a founder or CEO is like, I'm a cheerleader. I'm a storyteller. My job every day is to go tell everybody what our product does and why they need to use it. And that's like a never-ending job from a kind of a marketing perspective.

Doug Morneau: So a question that I wanna ask you that's a Tim Ferriss question from one of his latest books. And that is, “What's the bad advice that you constantly hear in your business?”

Matt Watson: Oh. I don't know, that's a good question.

Doug Morneau: Yeah, I thought so. I mean, he … I read his book and I thought, “Wow, everyone always talks … wants to give you advice. But what's the bad advice that if you take you're going down the wrong path?” I mean, my kind of rule of thumb for advice is you never ask anyone for advice that hasn't done what you do or is willing to pay the price that you're willing to pay. Because they don't have any vested interest, and they don't have the experience that you need.

Matt Watson: Yeah. I mean I think one of the key things is just, especially when it comes to sales and marketing, is trying everything and trying to be really diligent about customer acquisition cost and all those things. And really taking your time. But yeah, I don't know if I have a key bad advice that everybody says all the time.

Doug Morneau: Well, fair enough. So do you wanna share with us a little bit about your application? It said … one of the questions … I was looking at your background, bio here. And as someone who's always online and I use a thousand different tools, and the question says, “Why does software break all the time?” So why doesn't it work?

Matt Watson: Well, that's a good question. So one of the biggest reason is that it's always changing. So the more things change, the more they break. It's kind of the opposite of stability, right? And we live in the … you know, if you go back 10 years ago, 15 years ago, getting a new version of some software meant somebody mailed you a new CD. And you would update the software via CD, right?

Well, now we live in this world where everything is web-based. It's a web application. And developers can make changes literally at any moment. And most of the time, they're making changes every week. Definitely every month. Sometimes every day. Sometimes multiple times a day. And the more things change, the more they break. It's like playing whack-a-mole. You know, you think you're fixing some issue or releasing some new feature that everybody's gotta have. But inadvertently, you break something else. It's a never-ending process. And it's what I always say. It's like if you want something to be really stable, the thing you gotta do it stop changing it, right?

I was at a … I'm in the Kansas City area, right? And a lot of people may not realize this, but there's all the Minuteman silos are here. So it's where the government put all the giant nuclear missiles underground that could fire at any moment. And some of them are no longer used. But there are some, I think like up in Montana, are still active. But those things still run software from like the 1950s and they're not connected to the internet. The software is like the most stable software in the world. ‘Cause it's never been changed. Right?

If you want software that really works, that's what you have to do. But nobody does that, right? They want a new feature. They want a new this and new that. And that's what causes it all to break all the time.

Doug Morneau: Well that's interesting. That's so counter-intuitive to what … you know, from what I thought. I was reading Elon Musk's book over the summer and listening to him talk about the software they were using in the rockets. And I'm going like, “Wow, this stuff is so outdated.” And so my thought was exactly the opposite of what you're saying. It's like, “Why don't they have the new stuff and that's what they were building?” But, wow. Okay, well …

Matt Watson: Well, if it works, you don't wanna break it, right? Think about the self-driving cars these days. You know, what happens when they introduce a bug into the software for self-driving cars?

Doug Morneau: Yeah, I'm not a fan of that. I love driving so I don't think I'll be comfortable sitting back letting a machine drive me.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
SHARE THIS EPISODE: – SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

[just click to tweet]

SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

Create content for your products and services. Write about it – a lot
Go where your customers are to get their attention
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Matt Watson: Yeah. I mean, with Tesla. They're trying to figure out how to land the rockets, right? After they use the rockets, they have to come back down and land.

Doug Morneau: Yup.

Matt Watson: And it's a lot of trial and error of tweaking the software and hoping the next time it works. Either that, or it blows up.

Doug Morneau: I mean, maybe that's the question we need to ask when we're buying software. It's like, “How often do you guys update your software?” And if they say, “Well we update it every day,” then that's probably not the tool or application for me.

Matt Watson: Well, that's not necessarily. It depends on the practices of the team and how good a job they do of testing things of quality. And those are a lot of things that Stackify is trying to help with. We're trying to help developers ship code faster because they have more confidence in the fact that they're software works. They've tested it, they've found bugs, they've found that kind of stuff 'cause our software helps. And once they do the release, they do their deployment, we're kind of their eyes and ears to find the problems quickly. Hopefully, before all their customers find it. You know, so having those kinda tools and best practices in place help a lot. And companies can do it, they can move fast and do that. But they've gotta have the right kind of practices in place, otherwise, they're just kinda shooting from the hip and who knows what's gonna happen.

Doug Morneau: Well, I know what'll happen. I've been involved in launches where we haven't tested everything. It doesn't always go well.

Matt Watson: Oh yeah, absolutely.

Doug Morneau: So where is the best place for people to find you?

Matt Watson: You can definitely find me on LinkedIn. You can find me on Twitter, mattwatson81 on Twitter. But you can definitely find me on LinkedIn and connect. If anyone has any questions, I'll be glad to try and help them out.

Doug Morneau: And then I'm just … I was reading your blog. You're right, there's a ton of content on there. So if you wanna see what Matt's doing in terms of content and content marketing, there's some good examples of how he's posting, how much content's there, and how it's all laid out.

Matt Watson: Yeah, it's at stackify.com.

Doug Morneau: Excellent. Who's one guest I have to have on the podcast?

Matt Watson: Ooh. You know, I'm sure you've heard this name before but I'm always kind of a fan of Neil Patel for some reason.

Doug Morneau: Ah, yes. Yeah, he's an awesome guy. And of course, that would make sense with your background in SEO.

Matt Watson: So, I love his … somebody who does a great job of blogging. I love his kind of daily updates of stuff. Always little interesting nuggets to read about.

Doug Morneau: Well, when I read his stuff, I mean I'm both excited and a little disappointed 'cause I look at how much content he produces and how he sets it up and how he interlinks. And it's almost frightening the machine he's built there to do that.

Matt Watson: Yeah, it is. It is crazy, yes.

Doug Morneau: Well hey, thanks so much, Matt. Appreciate you taking the time today. Thanks for sharing with our audience. Thanks for being open and candid about your previous businesses and some of the challenges. We've got people that are at various stages of business development that listen to the podcast and there's some great tips and information there.

Matt Watson: All right, thanks a lot for having me.

Doug Morneau: So thanks very listeners for tuning in. As usual, we'll make sure that we transcribe all the show notes and all the details for this episode. It'll be online within a few days. And then Matt's information, and all the links to it. His own podcast and his blog and his LinkedIn and social media will be there. So thanks again for tuning in, and we'll see you next episode.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
SHARE THIS EPISODE: – SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

[just click to tweet]

SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

Create content for your products and services. Write about it – a lot
Go where your customers are to get their attention
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Get in touch with Matt

Resources

 

Links to other podcast and or blog posts:

Real Marketing Real Fast Podcast – host Doug Morneau – Episode #48

SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

 

Share your thoughts, comments 
and post your questions below: