HIGHLIGHTS AND TIPS FROM THE NEW MEDIA SUMMIT

Highlights and Tips from The New Media Summit in San Diego

  • Doug's main takeaway from the New Media Summit: Nothing beats a face to face meeting
  • Be businesslike about your podcast
  • Thank you Steve Olsher!
  • If you would like to be on a podcast listen to the podcast, tailor your pitch to meet the needs of the show, and then promote it to your followers

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HIGHLIGHTS AND TIPS FROM THE NEW MEDIA SUMMIT

Nothing beats a face to face meeting, Be businesslike, thank you Steve Olsher, advice on being a great podcast guest
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Rod: Hi, this is Rod and Doug with the Real Marketing Real Fast Podcast. We might sound like we're dragging a little bit and there's some background noise because we're sitting on an Air Canada flight coming back from the New Media Summit, where Doug was a, he was an icon. That was the term that they gave to certain people. And it was kind of a cool event where people were able to pitch their programs and why they might like to be a guest on different people's shows, so Doug and I, we've just been debriefing here on the plane. We thought we would just share a couple of our highlights from the event, so Doug why don't you take it away and just share what your one or two main takeaways for you?

Doug: Yeah we had a blast, I mean the energy was really awesome and I think that in the days of virtual summits and online training and, evergreen webinars, I get that. I use them, I attend them, but really I guess the big takeaway is nothing beats having a face to face meeting. So, while we were sitting and listening to various podcasters or business people pitching us as potential guests, that was really just two minutes out of the day so I would say that was kind of like the digital footprint that you'd get if you were doing something online.

So you hear it and see it but the real meaning, and the real meetings, and the real conversations and relationships were developed over a cup of coffee, a glass of wine, or a meal, or in some cases, we did a Starbucks run. So our hotel wasn't close to Starbucks, so we decided to jog there in the morning, grab a coffee, and I shared that out to the crowd, and the next morning there's somebody else there to join us, so we spent a couple days running to Starbucks and having a conversation.

So one of the takeaways was, while it's great to online and online video, and virtual summits, it's equally important to make sure you get some real face time with people, and it's worth sucking it up, buying the ticket, traveling to where it is, and then sitting down and taking advantage of that time.

Rod: Cool. I think for me it was just a good reminder to be businesslike about our podcast, and yeah not to be afraid of that or ashamed of that, and to be strategic along the way, you know. Think about who your guests are gonna be, why you want them on the show, see if they have anything to help and offer to your guests, and I'm with you. It was just great to meet people and find out what they're all about, and what they have to offer, and determine if they have anything to offer your audience as well, so yeah cool. Anything else?

Doug: Yeah I'd say for me the big takeaway or the big advantage was, Steve Olsher invited me down to be part of this, and so there was 40 icons and 150 people in attendance that were pitching. And it was really just about hanging out with our peers, other people that are podcasters and business people in various, their own rights. Getting to know them and coming away with opportunities, not only just to interview people, so that was obviously the purpose of the conference, but the bigger opportunities at least in my situation were for joint ventures. So it was really a no-brainer to talk to several of the people that were there at the event about very strategic, very specific opportunities to work on.

And in some cases, in a couple cases, we bought products and services from people that were there pitching, that I would never have had access to or been exposed to, so again it really comes back to, you wanna grow your business, you need to get around like minded people who are willing to pay the same price that you are, they're willing to show up, they're willing to invest, and they're willing to share. So it was just a forum where people were very eager to share and to help each other. We learned a lot of stuff. And you know my brain right now, is swimming with ideas.

I had trouble sleeping last night after having our last brainstorming session yesterday because there were just so many good ideas and feedback, and the feedback's coming from real people that are doing this. So it's a lot different than looking at somebody who may be positioning themselves as an expert, but you really don't know what they're doing. We had a chance to do some really deep dives with very specific techniques that people were using for driving traffic to the podcast, engaging listeners, driving conversions, increasing sales, and some of these guys had increased their podcasts or podcast following as well as their sales, but like 400 and 500% in six months.

So it was a great event. We wanna thank Steve Olsher for doing a great job with the New Media Summit, and I'm looking forward to the next event that's coming up. I think it's in September in Dallas.

Rod: Just one more thing, we had this conversation in … Doug's just getting some water. I'm good. We talked about this going down there, like what we thought would make a good pitch, and people having to pitch their products all the time, and that sort of thing. There's probably, there might be some people listening to this who wanna pitch their show to you, or wanna be on your podcast. What was a couple of elements or couple things that really stood out to you in terms of, now that we've seen 150 pitches, what stood out to you in terms of what made for a good pitch? What caught your attention?

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HIGHLIGHTS AND TIPS FROM THE NEW MEDIA SUMMIT

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Doug: Well I think we all have the tendency when we want to pitch somebody our idea, our product, or service, to start talking about features and benefits and building our credibility, and who we are, and all the stuff that we've done. And what's the end all for me is people who understand my audience. So this isn't a, I'm better than anybody else, it's just, you know if you want to come on my show if you want me to consider interviewing you on the podcast, listen to an episode or listen to two episodes. I mean that's just integrity. Why would you wanna come onto somebody's podcast, if you didn't know what their message was and how the show flowed. So yes you could say, “Hey, I got on a podcast or it got on 10 podcasts,” but big deal. You need to find the podcast that's your fit, so my style's not gonna appeal to everybody. So listen to an episode.

The other thing, my recommendation is, write a review. Listen to a couple episodes, write a review. I mean if you're not willing to write the review and endorse the podcast that you'd like to be a guest on, again what does that say about your belief level of the quality of the person that you're pitching, and you're asking them to invest their time, 30 minutes or an hour on an interview, and then on the backside, the cost of production to produce that with a producer and an editor, and then the cost of marketing them. So there are a couple things, listen to a couple episodes, write an endorsement, rate the show, and then reach out to the guests. And you know yes we're interested in your background, and the services that you offer, but what problem can you solve? So what is the problem that your product or service solves for my listeners, or somebody's else's listeners?

And then lastly, don't be shy. If you've got a social media following, and you're on one platform, or five platforms, or however many platforms, and or you have an email list, again don't be shy to say, “You know what? I'm willing to take your podcast, after my interview, and push that to my thousand people, five thousand people, ten thousand,” whatever the number is because that's an encouragement to the host. Because the host's gonna get more traction. But beyond getting more traction for the host, the reality is, you're coming on the podcast to get exposure. So you can talk about yourself all day long, and people kind of tune out, but it's different when somebody else talks about you.

So if you're on my show and I'm talking about you, I would drive as much traffic there as you can. Because it's me talking about you and positioning you as the expert in your industry. So it's not about me saying, “Hey, I want you to send out to your social connections so I can grow my show.” While that will grow my show, the biggest benefit seriously is for you, using your effort to drive people to the shows that you're on, so they can hear somebody else talk about you and position you as an expert.

Rod: Yeah it's that power like this is very much like a third-party endorsement thing.

Doug: Yeah.

Rod: Great, well thanks, everyone. We'll talk to you later.

Connect with Doug on social media.  He's active, engaged, will follow back, and build community.

Resources

Steve Olsher

Connect with Rod Janz 

Fuel Radio

Rod Janz on LinkedIn

Rod Janz – Twitter

Rod Janz – Instagram

HIGHLIGHTS AND TIPS FROM THE NEW MEDIA SUMMIT

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