WHAT I’VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

Tips based on what I've learned about blogging after two years with Heather Morneau

  • I think one of the biggest blogging myths is the fact that some people think that you need to have an entire novel in your mind and you need to sit down and write pages upon pages.
  • “You're still doing it, you're still losing it. How do you do it?” The more people asked, the more that there was a journey there and I thought, you know, maybe that is we share this with people, it would inspire or help other people.
  • What the plan was simply was to break it down into bite size pieces.
  • Other times I sit down and I'll start several different posts, but I find the more I force it, the worse the post ends up and I just trash it.
  • Well, there's a lot of half-truths. There's a lot of lies. There's a lot of sponsored information. So you think you're reading about dairy for example, and then you realize the page you've been fascinated with is actually sponsored.
  • There's a little bit of interaction on Facebook whereas I get more likes on Instagram, but it's the interaction that happens on Facebook.
  • Make sure that what you're writing about is something you're passionate about.
  • But the most important thing is to put pen to paper or fingers to keyboard and get it started.
  • People know that. Well, people can tell that with your writing as well. They can tell when you're fake.
  • I think people are really ready to get some honest information. I think I feel like people are ready for authenticity.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

[just click to tweet]

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

One of the biggest blogging myths is that people think that you need to sit down and write pages upon pages.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

I think one of the biggest blogging myths is the fact that some people think that you need to have an entire novel in your mind and you need to sit down and write pages upon pages.

Doug Morneau: Well, welcome back. Let's listen to another episode of Real Marketing Real Fast. Today in the studio, I've got joining my beautiful wife, Heather Morneau and now Heather reluctantly agreed to join me in the podcast episode. Actually not that reluctant. So Heather is a mom, a wife, an aunt. She's the co-founder of a company called q4fit.com a health and wellness website and she's a grandma as well. In her spare time, she is an Olympic weight lifter, so she's lifting weights now and she is a Crossfit fanatic, so she's in the Crossfit box with me at least a couple times a week. As a kid, she was an active teenager, but as most people can relate after school ends, so do most of the activity. She went through her life in her twenties and started having babies and stay at home mom and had some unwanted pounds to start to show up.

Her struggle with weight and weight loss has been a part of her life's journey. Years later I became quite sick and nearly died of double pneumonia. That kind of triggered for both of us, a realization that we needed to be healthy if we wanted to be around to see our kids get married and have grandkids or see our grandkids be around as well.

So in the fall of 2011 after dealing with a very sick husband, she decided to start documenting her health journey and writing a blog. Two-and-a-half years later, she's been blogging now once or twice a week and just sharing that journey. So I've asked her to join us on the podcast today just to share a little bit of insight of what it's like to be a blogger, how to get set up, how to relieve some of that stress and strain of writing and some of the myths around that. So I'd like to welcome Heather to the Real Marketing Real Fast podcast today. Well, welcome, Heather. I'm super excited to have you on the Real Marketing Real Fast podcast today.

Heather Morneau: No, I'm really happy to be here.

Doug Morneau: So was there anything I left out in the introduction or do you want to just share just a little bit of your background and how you got started as a writer and a blogger?

Heather Morneau: Well, I think you've got everything in the introduction down pat. I got started simply because of a personal journey and want to share my personal journey with people and felt that the easiest way for me is to do it through writing. I'm way more comfortable writing with the keyboard than I am doing this on the radio. So writing made sense.

Doug Morneau: Yeah but writing for a lot of people is a challenge. So what was your personal journey that got you started? Then we'll talk a little bit, dive a little bit deeper into your topic and what you're doing.

Heather Morneau: My personal journey. Well, I was a stay at home mom for most of my life, raising the kids and being a pretty typical woman, I believe in that I gained weight as I did it because my priorities were my children. It came to a point where we decided collectively it was time to once and for all get rid of some of the excess weight. As we started losing weight, as the pounds kind of started melting away, people kept asking, “You're still doing it, you're still losing it. How do you do it?” The more people asked, the more that there was a journey there and thought, you know, maybe that is we share this with people, it would inspire or help other people.

Doug Morneau: So then your decision was, “Hey, you know, I don't like speaking to people. So I think I'm more comfortable writing. So I'll write about my health and wellness journey and maybe help people through your personal stories.” Is that the idea?

Heather Morneau: Well I love talking to people, but I'm way better one-on-one in front of people. The public speaking thing that is not in my comfort zone. We had gone to a conference in the Philippines and represented, there were different people in different social media venues. There was someone who was a YouTube blogger, there was someone who was an actual blogger. There were people doing all sorts of different things, Facebook, Instagram, and we listened to each of these people get up and talk about what they do and why they do it and how they do it. Something happened when one of the guys got up and started talking about blogging and I'm not even sure why it connected with me, but I thought, you know what, that's something I think I can do. I think I thought-

Doug Morneau: Who was this mystery person?

Heather Morneau: Well, his blog site is actually called ProBlogger. So when Darren Rowse got up on stage and started talking, I think one of the reasons I connected with him was although he seemed comfortable on stage, you could tell he was a writer and that's where he was comfortable. Going back to what I did in school, I did really well through English and writing and thought, you know because this is a personal thing I can write about what I know. And that's a journey through losing weight, gaining weight and everything in between.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

[just click to tweet]

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

One of the biggest blogging myths is that people think that you need to sit down and write pages upon pages.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Doug Morneau: Yeah, I've read a lot of your posts and it's more than just your journey. I mean there are lots of… you're offering lots of advice and it looks like you do lots of research and some of the blog posts you curate. So often people say, “Hey, they can't write or it's a lot of work to be a blogger or produce content.” So do you have a particular strategy that you use when you're trying to create content? I mean writing one or two posts a week seems like a lot of work.

Heather Morneau: Well it can be if you expect to sit down and do it all at once. We had also done a conference regarding making YouTube videos and so I kind of created a plan and took bits and pieces of both of these speakers. What the plan was simply was to break it down into bite size pieces. So in my day and in my calendar, I sit down and have a brainstorming session planned out and I just take a pencil and paper and any item that comes into my mind, some things somebody has said or an article, I read, a picture, a commercial, anything like that. I just make crazy notes and that's it for that day. I don't want to spend everything all in one day. And so then I'll sit down and break out another day and I'll write and again, it's really rough.

It's just the basics of what a blog post will be. Then I'll sit down on another day at another time and I edit. For me breaking it down into those small bite-sized pieces, my mind is still spinning as I'm away from the computer, but I'm still able to get other things done in the day. So then when I sit down and edit, that's when I find the quotes that go on the bottom and the cute little pictures and everything like that. I just find it easier to break things down into a time frame that works for me.

Doug Morneau: Well I like your idea of brainstorming. As you said, you just have a notebook full of ideas and then when you sit down to the keyboard, I guess you … do you just pick one and then create a rough draft or do you write several drafts at once?

Heather Morneau: It kind of depends on where the brain is going. Sometimes I already have an idea in my mind and I can sit down and it just kind of flows out my fingers. Other times I sit down and I'll start several different posts, but I find the more I force it, the worse the post ends up and I just trash it. So with having multiple ideas on my paper, I've got a place for my mind to kind of swim along, churning out a few ideas and something will always click. If the ideas aren't there on the page for brainstorming, I get lost. Then I end up with what people call writer's block. At that point, I have to get up, leave the computer, walk around, do something different, get my brain doing something completely different and then come back to it.

Doug Morneau: So how often do you write currently?

Heather Morneau: I was at a really, really good schedule of publishing twice a week. Worked well for me. Life got busy, life changed. I haven't been writing as much recently, but I'm back into writing on a regular basis. I try and get once a week I get a new post published. I'm actually currently in the process of doing some homework according to some research that I had just seen from Neil Patel. He said that you should be writing your blog posts in comparison to who your competition is that you're writing around. So trying to figure out whether I should be writing more or less to make sure that I'm in the right space for the number of posts.

Doug Morneau: Yeah, and I think in that article he also talked about looking at the gap. So when you're looking at creating content, look for gaps, look at your competitors, see how many articles they're publishing, what sort of ranking they're getting. If you're looking at a wide variety of publishers, that gives you an opportunity to see if there's a high ranking article like one or two of your competitors writing about, which will allow you to leverage that a for your SEO.

Heather Morneau: Sure. Yeah.

Doug Morneau: So what's one of the biggest myths that you think people have about writing and blogging?

Heather Morneau: I think one of the mega biggest myths is the fact that some people think that you need to have an entire novel in your mind and you need to sit down and write pages upon pages. I don't believe that's true at all. There are some blog posts that are really quite short. There are some blog posts that are pages and pages, but I think if you pay attention to who your audience is, you'll find out how much you have to write. For me, it's not as much of a chore. I know. So if you're not a writer, writing is a chore. I think if you're writing about what you are passionate about and what makes you feel good, it's a whole lot easier. I'll sit down and do research on a recipe or on why we should or should not eat a certain thing. That's important to me. So it's interesting. So I quite enjoy it. So it's not a chore. So then maybe that's the other thing is to make sure that what you're writing about is something that you're passionate about and you like it.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

[just click to tweet]

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

One of the biggest blogging myths is that people think that you need to sit down and write pages upon pages.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Doug Morneau: Yeah, I guess that makes sense. I mean if it's something that you like, it's easy to research and write about. So in terms of your mix, how many of the articles that you typically write, you write yourself or create from an idea versus how many you curate versus how many are a researched article?

Heather Morneau: Most of what I write, I write. Recipes I typically find that I like from someone else. I was at one point writing one and curating one per week. The problem too is making sure that the other writers out there are actually writing about the same era, the same people that I'm kind of gearing my articles towards. A lot of people get really caught up and going on a direction that I don't feel that the people who are writing or reading my stuff that it's just not the right people.

Doug Morneau: So what's been the toughest thing about consistently writing? So you've been writing now for what, a couple of years? Two to two-and-half years.

Heather Morneau: Yeah.

Doug Morneau: So what's the toughest … what's the biggest obstacle you face in be consistent in your writing?

Heather Morneau: I think part of it is that a lot of time I want to talk about the same thing over and over again because it's important. I can't seem to stress enough certain aspects of the getting healthy and losing weight game and it seems like everybody seems to get so caught up in the fads and the current and the quick fixes and that they miss what's really important. Sometimes I find that I'm writing about things that are so close to the heart that there, not enough factual information. The thing is is that I, in this particular industry, I think you could write every single day of the week, two or three articles a day and you could never hit the same item twice because there's so much information out there and that becomes difficult as well because people get confused.

Doug Morneau: Yeah. I mean we're, we live in the same house. We eat at the same table. So yeah, we have lots of these discussions about the food, the fads, the lobbyist that, “Hey, you can, you can eat eggs now. You couldn't eat eggs and you shouldn't eat bread now but the bread was fine before and fats are okay now” and so back and forth. So it's not surprising that the consumer is confused with the plethora of information, articles, blog posts and videos out there and everything that's happening around the world in health and wellness.

Heather Morneau: Well, there's a lot of half-truths. There's a lot of lies. There's a lot of sponsored information. So you think you're reading about dairy for example, and then you realize the page you've been fascinated with is actually sponsored by the dairy board. So no wonder it's all supportive of the dairy industry and then you'll read another one and in support of nut milk and things like that. Again to realize that it's been sponsored by the companies that grow the nuts or that manufacture that. So the research aspect sometimes is quite tricky because you have to realize who's giving you the information

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

[just click to tweet]

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

One of the biggest blogging myths is that people think that you need to sit down and write pages upon pages.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Doug Morneau: Well and I think what makes it worse and kind of amplifies that whole thing of misinformation and half-truths is how quickly we are as consumers to like and share other people's content without reading it. I know I'm guilty of that. I'll like lots of stuff and often I find myself sharing stuff and going, “No, I can't share that until I go back and read to see, you know, is this company or business or person actually sharing, you know, from the same point of view that I have or is it a believable story?”

Heather Morneau: Well, I can guarantee that people don't read a lot of even what I publish because I'll put something up on Instagram and within 30 seconds I've had all sorts of different likes on it and it's like, “Yes did you like it because I picked a cute picture or did you like it 'cause you actually clicked on the link, went to my website and read it?” You know that in that time frame they've clicked it and liked it just because.

Doug Morneau: So what social media do you use to try to get the word out and to repurpose your content?

Heather Morneau: We have Q4FIT on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. We also have a Linkedin page. When I write the blog it goes onto our blog site. And then it also gets published on each of the sites that I said, the Facebook, Instagram, Twitter.

Doug Morneau: Is there any one particular social site that you get the most feedback from?

Heather Morneau: Yeah, it's Facebook. It is because there's a little bit of interaction on Facebook whereas I get more likes on Instagram, but it's the interaction that happens on Facebook.

Doug Morneau: So for people that are listening to this, they're thinking that sounds good. I'd like to write, I'd like to write a post a week or maybe two posts a week or a post a month. What advice would you give them just to get started and make that … create that first post?

Heather Morneau: I think it would be, make sure that what you're writing about is something you're passionate about. For me, I sat down with old fashioned pencil and paper and that worked. If I mean if that doesn't work, don't do that. Do computer, do your phone, do whatever device however you want. But write some notes, get some ideas down and just scribble some stuff and then walk away from it and then go back to it and then walk away from it. I think you'll find if you take different sets of notes, you'll start forming your own ideas and you'll start seeing what kind of writing you seem to want to do. I know of a particular person that wrote in a very particular way, very business minded, very sales minded. No-

Doug Morneau: You're not going to mention that person are you?

Heather Morneau: Once he finally started writing from a place of personal places, a few family stories, a little bit of his own heart kind of getting into it. The writing changed. It became much easier and it was in his true self coming out. So I think that's the other thing. You have to realize what kind of style. There are so many different styles for blogging too. You can just make it factual, do some research, throw some facts like an old fashioned grade 10 science paper or make it a personal journey story or make it a story about someone else. Make it like a little short story. So you just got to figure out what works for you. But the most important thing is to put pen to paper or fingers to keyboard and get it started.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

[just click to tweet]

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

One of the biggest blogging myths is that people think that you need to sit down and write pages upon pages.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Doug Morneau: Well, and if I think of our good friend in, I don't know if he's a good friend, but something that we both like to listen and I've seen speak Gary Vaynerchuk, he talks about creating content. He says, “Create content basically that you're passionate about. And then you know, without worrying about whether people like it. So don't sit down to say, ‘What can I create that's going to be a post that people like or what can I create that's going to be viral because you know, you can't create viral, viral happens.'” Just like you said, “Write, write from the heart, be authentic.” Obviously, you write for your audience, that's the subject matter. But be authentic. Don't try to create a post that people will like.

Heather Morneau: Oh, people can tell a fake smile across the room. When you walk into the room and you've got a fake smile on because whatever happened on the way to the event that you just walked into. People know that. Well, people can tell that with your writing as well. They can tell when you're fake. They can tell when it's forced. It's not interesting. Most people are just going to scan what you're writing to begin with to find out whether should I read more and they'll find the fake really right away. So don't be fake. It's just not worth it.

Doug Morneau: Now is there a certain length that you write to? So when you're writing do you have a goal of, 500 words 1,000 words? Do you have any particular goal in your writing or do you just write until enough content to tell the story?

Heather Morneau: Yeah, I just write to tell the story. Generally, mine ends up being somewhere about 800 words. I find for me personally, I find that a comfortable length. If it's too long, like I said, then it just becomes a science paper. If it's too short, maybe you haven't told enough information. Having said that, if I've curated somebody else's post, I don't need to reiterate everything they're going there, get from their post or their video or the reason I'm curating it is that they've done an excellent job. So pay attention to what they're saying. I'm just going to do an introduction. So those posts are always shorter, but I find 800 is a comfortable length for me. Somehow that just seems to come out.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

[just click to tweet]

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

One of the biggest blogging myths is that people think that you need to sit down and write pages upon pages.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Doug Morneau: Yeah. I've noticed when you curate a post that you just add your own bit of flair and your own take or perspective on it. As you said, you don't try to cut and paste somebody else's whole article. It's just, “Hey this is what I read, this is what I like. It's really cool. Here's the link.” Then you just unselfishly just post a link and encourage people to click through to read it.

Heather Morneau: Yep. Yep. There's no point in repetition. If I'm sending you to somebody else's link, that's what I want you to spend your time doing because I find that that information is more valuable than me repeating what they're going to say. Then you're going to go on and go, “Well that's just a waste of time.” So just tell them to go and pay attention.

Doug Morneau: So what are you most excited about today as it relates to your business Q4Fit and you're writing in the next 6 to 12 months?

Heather Morneau: I'm really excited because I find that from what I have seen, I think people are really ready to get some honest information and there's always going to be the fads. I think I feel like people are ready for authenticity. They're ready for people to go, “You know what? I know you want to lose those 10 pounds to get into your sisters, you know the dress for your sister's wedding. But this is a lifelong thing. What is it going to take to do that?” I think that that I can, I don't know, maybe it's just where I'm at in my life, but I feel that people are ready to be authentic and real. Part of that process is getting healthy. That we, we know so much more about the GMOs that are really dangerous. Every week there's another carcinogen that we're finding out that we shouldn't be eating. People are encouraged by that because they're realizing that they can get healthy. So it's exciting to be able to share with people a normal human's perspective of how to get healthy and live longer and better.

Doug Morneau: Well, it's interesting. I mean because to be authentic is almost the new buzzword. It's a new thing. It's the new shiny object. I mean, I had a guest on my podcast just recently, a Megan Macedo and she talked about how to be your authentic self in your professional life. So, that's what she teaches people is how to do exactly what you're saying. How do you know there's a business side to it, but how do you share your knowledge and help people move along, but do it in a way that you're comfortable and you feel good about yourself and feel good about helping people. So that's I guess what everybody's striving for these days at least in producing content.

Heather Morneau: It shouldn't be something that you have to teach. I mean people should be authentic, but they're not because they have most of us, once we reach a certain age, we've grown up in you got to fake it to make it attitude or you have to put on your business shoes and then your home hat and your different people in different places, which is just so wrong. That's the way we grew up and now it's time to just be ourselves.

Doug Morneau: Well that's really cool. Love seeing what you're doing. It's really interesting. I mean it's something as you know, that I struggle with, writing has not been my friend. I'd rather podcast or speak in front of an audience, but the writing's been my least favorite thing to do. As you pointed out, yes, since I changed the style of my writing in my newsletter and I did that knowing that people would unsubscribe and my thinking was, well if they unsubscribe because they don't like my style, then that's perfect because obviously, they weren't my tribe, so they should just move along and find somebody that's more their style.

Heather Morneau: See, there you go. What it takes is reading other people's stuff that you think, you know what? I think I might be able to write like that but if you don't read it, you'll never know whether you can write like that.

Doug Morneau: So a question for you that I'm stealing from Tim Ferriss. What some of the bad advice that you hear when you are out someplace and you hear someone talking about, “Hey, I'd like to be a writer or I'd like to start writing or like to be a blogger.” What's some of the bad advice you hear that's Kind of makes you cringe?

Heather Morneau: I don't know. I think it's actually, to be honest, I haven't met a lot of other people that blog because everybody says that blogging is not where it is. Everybody says you have to do video. Maybe that's bad advice. Forget about writing. People just want video. I disagree. Not everybody wants video and not everybody can do video.

Doug Morneau: Fair enough. Yeah, I mean there's definitely a move to video, but it's funny how when something new comes along, the assumption is, “Hey, let's throw everything out.” It's like in my business everyone says, “Hey, the email doesn't work.” It's still the highest ROI of any online media. There's something new that's out there. So throw out everything else. So video's here, so don't write. People learn different ways. Some people like to read, some people listen, read books, some people listen to books, some people watch YouTube.

Heather Morneau: Well there was the thought process when they started putting books online that the print industry would disappear, that nobody would want an actual bound book. Yeah, that's not really happening. I get that print newspaper is kind of fading, but that's just because people want it quick and so they get it digitally. The fear that the print book is leaving is far from over. See that's the thing with blogging it's exactly where people are. It's digital, it's on your phone, it's on your desktop, your laptop, your tablet. It's wherever. I think the reason it appeals to so many people is that it's bite-size rather than an entire movie. It's the 30-minute episode kind of thing. I think that's why blogging is as good as it is.

Doug Morneau: I want to say thanks for taking the time today. I want to ask you a couple of questions and then let you get back to your day. Our first question is, who's one guest that you absolutely think I have to have in my podcast?

Heather Morneau: Wow. I've actually put a little thought into this and I think somebody that you sort of, well you know of, but I think she'd be amazing on your show would be Kaelin Tuell Poulin the LadyBoss. She has absolutely killed it in the weight loss industry. She wrote a book, she lost weight, she wrote a book and then she's got the most amazing membership site. This woman brings energy as you've never seen. I think she'd be phenomenal because she'd be able to share with your listeners what it takes to go from zero to hero really fast.

Doug Morneau: That's cool. Yeah, I did me, I have seen some of her stuff. Obviously, I'm not subscribed to LadyBoss. I'm not the pink Sparco type. I know you're not either but you've had obviously a closer look at that. So last question, where can people find you?

Heather Morneau: I write for a blog called Q4Fit. My emails on there, you can reach me through the website. I'm also on Instagram @q4fit or personally on Facebook. I don't do as much of the other socials as I should, but I'm always available at the Q4fit website and my email address is on there. heathermorneau@q4fit.com.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

[just click to tweet]

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

One of the biggest blogging myths is that people think that you need to sit down and write pages upon pages.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Doug Morneau: There we go. Hey, super good. Good to hang out with my wife for an episode.

Heather Morneau: Even though we're in the same house but totally different rooms.

Doug Morneau: Yeah, well that's not uncommon. We do have our friends. what we won't mention that text each other while sitting in bed. Ryan and Jen. So thanks. Thanks for sharing. So there you go. There's another episode of Real Marketing Real Fast Today we talked with my beautiful wife Heather and we talked about blogging and her journey as she got started as a blogger a couple of years ago. If you want to see what she's writing and she does a great job writing and she also does a great job finding us super appropriate pictures to go with the blog post. That's not surprising why she gets all the Instagram likes. It's cute.

The letter Q4fit.com. I'll make sure that information is in the show notes, so I want to say thanks again. Big shout out to Heather and Q4fit. Thanks for listening, for tuning in. If you like this episode, if you've got comments, questions, suggestions, don't be shy. Leave them on the bottom of the transcribed episode and leave us a rating on iTunes if you like what you're hearing. So thanks for tuning in. I look forward to serving you on our next episode.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

[just click to tweet]

WHAT I'VE LEARNED AFTER TWO YEARS OF BLOGGING

One of the biggest blogging myths is that people think that you need to sit down and write pages upon pages.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Get in touch with Heather:

  • Website – Q4fit
  • Heather on LinkedIn
  • Email: heathermorneau@q4fit.com

Find out more about Heather and Q4fit:

Links to other related podcasts and or blog posts:

SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT CREATION TIPS

WRITING AUTHENTIC COPY